Good news!

Er det flere som meg der ute som unngår for mye “vanlige” nyheter? Det er nesten uhørt å fortelle om, og litt utenfor normen. Jeg får med meg de viktigste sakene fra nyhetsbrevet Skumlest, NY Times Climate Change News Letter og nyhetspodkaster. Jeg kjenner mange som bruker flere timer daglig på på scrolle nettaviser for å holde seg oppdatert. Det er absolutt ingenting galt i det, men for meg er det som å bli bombardert med forferdeligheter, dårlige nyheter, grusomme menneskehandlinger og lidelse som vi ikke kan gjøre noe med. Personlig synes er jeg generelt imot å formidle med fryktbasert fremgangsmåte, og er opptatt av at det man fokuserer på er det man får mer av. Med en litt sart psyke kan det være mye å ta inn (hehe). Det blir som en mindfullnesshandling - å passe på hva man tar inn og lar seg påvirke av. Jeg vil derfor tipse dere om noen veldig fine sider.

  • Verdens Beste Nyheter formidler fremskritt og positive resultater fra utviklingsland.

  • Good News Network er en motreaksjon på alle de negative historiene som formidles gjennom ordinære media, og deler positive nyhetshistorier fra hele verden.

  • Huffpost Good News er en egen side på Huffpost hvor de deler positive historier om alt fra politikk til popstjerner.

  • SunnySkyz er en lignende side som Good News Network, hvor vi blant annet kan lese om positive miljøtiltak!

Det er utrolig motiverende å lese litt om hva som faktisk går bra her i verden for å bli inspirert til å fortsette å stå på for at verden skal utvikle seg i riktig retning <3

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ENGLISH: I am one of those people who easily feel really down reading the “regular” mainstream news. I don’t know if you can relate, but do you ever feel hopeless, depressed and discouraged by reading in depth about all the sad stories, disasters, catastrophes and awful things going on in the world? I therefore choose where I get information and inspiration from very wisely, also because I am a really sensitive person who takes in a lot from the outer world. I would therefore like to tip you about following some news outlets than mainly focus on the good stuff!

  • Good News Network is an antidote to the “barriage of negativity experienced through mainstream media” and offer positive news stories from around the world.

  • Huffpost Good News is a page within the Huffpost universe where they share positive stories on everything from politics to popstars.

  • SunnySkyz is a page similar to the Good News Network, where we can read about positive environmental projects, among others.

It is super inspiring to read about the good stuff in the world to feel like our actions matter and that the world actually is a quite good place!

22 ethical & eco-friendly christmas gift ideas

Now that Christmas is around the corner, it's time to present to you the ultimate minimalist, eco-friendly, ethical Christmas present guide! Christmas and the surrounding months are for some people synonymous with shopping mania, to-do lists, and stress and for those who want to avoid that, we have some cool tips. What's better than giving gifts with meaning, that are great for the planet too? Minimalism is actually about having fewer choices, and thereby less stress in your life. What could be better than that?

  1. Buy tickets to a musical/theater/cinema/concert/stand-up comedy show/art gallery opening. If you are looking to be more original, what about looking for outdoor movie screenings or a trip to the sauna in the Oslo fjord?
  2. An invitation to go for a cool hike, maybe plan it as a weekend getaway, and stay the night at a cabin in the woods. We recommend Trolltungen if you live in Norway.
  3. Homemade gifts are always a winner (except maybe those you brought home from the ceramics class in 3rd grade?). What about granola (we have a delicious suggestion here), sauerkraut ( this is a great recipe) or crisp bread? Give it in a big glass jar with a gift-band tied around, and you will be begged to make more.
  4. A treatment at an organic spa. In Oslo, we suggest testing out Greel Peel and in Lisboa we love Organii. In Copenhagen and Bali, you can enjoy a luxurious, organic experience at Hotel Guldsmeden
  5. Minimalist kit - everything needed for people who often buy food/drinks at cafés to take away, and don't want to use so much single-use plastic. Something like this.
  6. To the true environmentalists, a thoughtful gift is a washing bag that prevents microfibers from your clothes to enter the ocean. Radical! Guppy bags are cool.
  7. Organic makeup or cosmetics. Some favorites worth mentioning are: Evolve Organic Beauty (in Oslo you can find it at Green Spirit), ZAO nail polish without toxic ingredients, The Body Shop has tons of goodies, Dr. Organic's facial scrub with Manuka honey, and Eco Minerals mineral foundation.
  8. A homemade “gift card" to go second-hand shopping!
  9. Sustainable swimwear from the amazing brand Halla Halla.
  10. If your mother/sister/father/boyrfriend/friend is into yoga, we recommend that you have a look at Hejhej yoga mats!
  11. Eco-friendly candles is a super cool gift. There are tons of brands online, or most likely in your closest mall or health store.
  12. Lingerie in organic cotton. Oysho and Lindex have some affordable choices.
  13. If they are into more luxurious eco-conscious brands, check out Mara Hoffman, Reformation, and Stella McCartney
  14. Sunglasses from W.R.Yuma that are 3D printed from plastic waste. Just amazing.
  15. If the person is into surfing, you should check out these sustainable surfing brands: Eco Fins surfboard fins made from recycled waste,  Bees Knees natural organic surf wax and EcoLeash from the Ecosurfshop.
  16. The "perfect" white T-shirt made from sustainable materials from The White T-Shirt Co.
  17. For the pricier gifts, have a look at Patagonia. The company is taking huge steps towards sustainability!
  18. Sustainable water bottles are very popular, and some types have such a nice design too.
  19. Take away cups are lovely gifts for the coffee or tea lovers.
  20. Check out ethical gifts from charity organizations - you can give away vaccination, invest in building a school, providing a birth certificate or give a family goat.
  21. Order used books from Amazon, or give a Kindle or a subscription to an audiobook app or Spotify!
  22. Give a subscription to a city-bike!

Other tips for an eco-friendly Christmas

  • Use newspaper as gift wrapping, and decorate the presents with thing you can find in nature, like pines
  • Recycle the wrapping
  • Swap a meat meal for a veggie meal
  • Make a plant-based hot chocolate with homemade hemp milk instead of using cows milk

Have a lovely pre-christmas time!

5 things to do on a Sunday

Sundays are always special. It’s like my body just knows it’s Sunday and automatically goes into resting mode. I usually like to make my work out light on this day, like a walk in the woods or yoga. I am so used to working all the time, so when I all of a sudden have a whole day to myself, I almost forget what I like to do with my space time. So I gathered some inspiration and made a list of activities to do on a Sunday <3

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1. Make lists

I love to make lists. I use a program called Evernote, and I probably have over 100 different lists on there, from things I have to do, to my bucket list, to films and moves to watch or names I like. I love making lists, it takes the buzz out of my head and down on paper (or my Mac).

2. Go for a long walk outside

I love working out, and during the week it’s almost always indoor workouts. So Sunday is a perfect time to take a walk outside, either with a friend or with a podcast and get some fresh air.

3. Make some good home made food

Go crazy in the kitchen and test out a new recipe that you have been wanting to make. Since most stores are closed on Sundays, I like to make something easy like energy balls or granola of the things I already have at home. Even better, make home made banana nice cream with chocolate! All you need is 2-3 frozen bananas, 3 squares of chocolate, and 3 dates for a creamy consistency. Mix it all together and enjoy!

4. Organise at home

Some people really love organising, and others hate it. The thing most people have in common is that we like the end result - a neat and tidy home, and actually knowing where all are stuff is located. Spend some time organising at home, cleaning your room and the kitchen, and you will feel super good about it tomorrow and the rest of the week.

5. Make a good playlist on Spotify

If it’s one thing I can’t live without, it’s music! Life just get’s better with it. Or, you can subscribe to my list of chill out songs here.

Going zero waste with Stine Friis

Have you ever heard of the zero waste philosophy? It's a fantastic movement towards a world without waste through simple techniques you can incorporate into your daily life, and a reaction against the consumption society. This means reduce, reuse and send as little as possible to be recycled and to be composted. For some people, the philosophy might relate to the New Yorker Lauren Singer, one of the first famous zero waste role models out there. She makes her own deodorant and toothpaste, and actually managed to keep 2 years worth of trash in a mason jar!Whats exciting is that we have our very own zero waste superwoman right here in Europe - more specifically from a small town in Northern Norway. We had a chat with Stine Friis some days after she guested the national morning TV show God Morgen Norge (check the behind the scenes video here), to understand more about this mysterious subject.Hey Stine! Can you tell us a bit about yourself?Sure! I’m Stine Friis, 24, from a small town in Norway/Nowhere. I’m a copywriter and run a zero waste/sustainability blog.Can you explain briefly what zero waste is, and why is it so important?Zero waste is about reducing your climate impact through reducing consumption and producing as little trash as possible. Zero waste has us use our resources in a more thoughtful way, and lets resources go in a circle – instead of ending up in an incinerator or in a landfill. Everything we make should get reused or remade into something new. Reuse, repurpose or recycle. Don’t throw it away.

THE 5 ZERO WASTE PRINCIPLES: Refuse - say no to what you don't really need, reduce - reduce the consumption of what you need, reuse - use things multiple times, recycle - goes without saying, rot - compost your food.

NORWEGIAN TRASH TALK: On average each person in Norway produced about 433 kg (!) trash in 2016 (1).

How did you get interested in it?I realized that I was becoming vain. Suddenly I was into high-end makeup, and certain labels, with no thought for the person who made it – or what ingredients were in the products I bought. I used to be a politically active teenager and didn't really recognize myself anymore. So I started researching how I could become environmentally friendly, reduce my carbon footprint and consume without other people having to suffer. Slowly, I started to change my habits, decluttered my life – and got into zero waste.How does a meal become zero waste?Buy as many ingredients you can package free, or make stuff yourself. You don’t have to buy those plastic wrapped tortillas, you can totally make them from scratch. Try to choose sustainable brands when possible, skip the meat when you can – and don’t throw out the leftovers. Pop them in the fridge for lunch the next day. Recycle or reuse any packaging.What are your top five zero waste hacks for the daily life?

  1. Buy dry goods like beans, coffee, and popcorn in bulk with a cloth bag.
  2. Always keep a reusable cup in your bag
  3. Keep a spare tote bag in your purse or backpack.
  4. Be nice when you ask to have cheese, bread or whatever put into your food containers. If you’re nice it’s so much easier.
  5. If you find a store with self-checkout counters: use them! It will save you loads of funny looks.

Is it challenging to go zero waste in Norway?Partially. In Oslo, we have a few stores made for zero waste people like myself, but the products can be quite pricey. I go there for dried goods and opt for my local shop or international food store for vegetables and sweets. Our food budget is somewhat limited, as my boyfriend is still in university.In some of the bigger cities, there’s been an increase in zero waste/eco-friendly food stores in the past few years. But try staying zero waste in my hometown... it’s impossible.What are your favorite zero waste products?My coffee cup, cloth bags, menstrual cup and fountain pen. And my backpack.Follow Stine and her exciting story on Instagram, Facebook, YouTube and on her blog!Zero waste is a probably a big leap for most of us (authors included) but we really want to strive to follow Stines footsteps, and every small action counts. How about starting with saving your glass jars and use them for smoothies or to store bulk foods in, or bringing your own cup when you buy coffee in the morning? Personally, this is a bit of a barrier, but it will keep your coffee warm longer! Zero waste shopping can, with some planning, be done in many regular shops, but some specialty stores in Europe are worth mentioning for those interested:

If you need even more zero waste inspiration, Pinterest is a great source!

Get inspired by Oprah Winfrey

This woman has loads of good experiences to share - check out the interview with Oprah Winfrey on career, life, leadership and for a true inspiration boost on a Wednesday. Sometimes we all need to really feel if what we are doing is something that we love.//Denne dama har mange gode erfaringer å dele - sjekk ut intervjuet med Oprah Winfrey om karriere, livet og ledelse for en skikkelig inspirasjonsboost på en onsdag. Noen ganger kan man virkelig kjenne etter for å vite om man holder på med noe man liker og er skapt for å gjøre.